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Boo at the Zoo- The Invaders!


October 17, 2019

 

Feeling spooky? Then don’t miss “Boo at the Zoo- The Invaders!” presented by the Honolulu Zoo Society. Dress up as your favorite ghouls or ghosts and celebrate Halloween at the best family- friendly Halloween event! This family event will focus on invasive species and will have a wicked feature- the Invaders Haunted House. There will also be an Animal Habitat Trick-or-Treat Trail, Invasive Species Conservation Education Stations, Keiki Zone with Spooky Story Times, face painting, character picture taking, and of course, keiki crafts! There will be plenty of hair- raising fun for your little monsters to enjoy! Food items will be available for purchase from Taste, the Honolulu Zoo Catering.

 Did you know, Keiki is of Hawaiian origin and means “baby” or “child”, literally “the little one”.

 All these spooktacular events will be taking place on the Zoo’s Stage Lawn. This event is a fundraiser for the Honolulu Zoo. Admission will be $10 for Honolulu Zoo Society members, and $15 for non- members. Admission is free for keiki 2 years and under. If you are a Honolulu Zoo Society member purchasing tickets, you must present membership card and ID at time of purchase for discounted rate. Last admission will be at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are available for purchase online or at the gate the day of the event. This event is held Friday October 26th and Saturday October 27th from 5:30-8:00 p.m. Visit the Honolulu Zoo Society’s website to purchase your tickets or find more information. https://honoluluzoo.org/programs/boo-at-the-zoo/

 

 The Honolulu Zoo spans 42 acres and officially opened in 1877. The Honolulu Zoo is contained within the Queen Kapi’olani Park. This zoo has a royal history- It is the only zoo in the United States that originated in a King’s grant of royal lands to the people. In 1876, King David Kalakaua, Monarch of Hawai’i, made lands of the Leahi Crown Holdings available “to the people of Hawai’i”. The park was first opened to display King David Kalakaua’s bird collection and a horse racing track.

 

The zoo now has over 1,230 animals in custom designed habitats and regularly sees over 60,000 people each year who come to visit the zoo. While there are so many amazing animals to meet, don’t forget about their magical botanical garden! Some of the most resilient and lovely plants are native to Hawaii or have a long history of specialized importance to the Polynesian cultures.

 

 Did you ever wonder which plant was used for the classic lei making that is notorious in Hawaii? The Kupukupu Fern– Nephrolepis exaltata- This pretty mini sword fern is native to Hawaii. It makes a nice groundcover and is used for lei making. Be sure to find this and many other exotic plants at the Zoo’s Botanical Gardens! 

 We wish you a hauntingly, frightening, ghoulishly- delightful Halloween celebration this year!



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